Friday, December 19, 2014

No Dumping

By Kit Fischer

Every hunter has heard the old mantra “the real work begins after you shoot an animal”.  Even after your critter is hauled back to your truck, hung in your garage, butchered and packaged, the job isn’t completely finished.  What about all the meat trimmings, bones, hide and skull?  While it’s tempting to toss it in the alley and hope for the best, most folks recognize that open, rotting meat in an urban location is not ideal.  This often results in folks tossing their game carcass in the back of the pickup the next time they head up in the woods for easy disposal.

8 days ago.  I was headed up Pattee Canyon to get a Christmas tree.  A new dusting of snow has created a winter wonderland.  A dozen or so cars are parked along various turnouts – some walking dogs, others with saws in hand and family in tow, searching for the perfect Christmas tree.  Norman Maclean couldn't have written  a more Montana  scene—except for the blood spattered road and  carcasses.

 The dumping of game carcasses along county and Forest Service roads and in front of locked gates doesn’t exactly ring of Christmas cheer.  Not only is dumping your big game carcass on state and federal lands usually illegal, it’s ugly and it’s irresponsible. Here are the FWP regs related to carcass disposal: http://fwp.mt.gov/news/newsReleases/hunting/nr_1978.html

Not only do ill-placed carcasses attract scavengers to places they shouldn’t be, that illegal dumping also stains the image of hunters. 

I, and for that fact, most Montanans whether you hunt or not don’t like to have to tip-toe around deer carcasses when I go out looking for a Christmas tree on the outskirts of town.  Not to mention, carcasses pose serious health risks, especially if they are placed near a stream or waterway.  The third issue with dumping carcasses willy-nilly is that you could be facilitating the transmission of a disease from one area of the state to another.  And who wants that on their conscience?

So what’s the easiest solution? 

1.       Bone out your critter in the field.
2.       Get a sweet new pair of gloves for your big game hide from Pacific Recycling
3.       Chop your bones to snack size and give them to your pooch for Christmas.

4.       Toss them in your garbage can or run it up to the landfill (preferably the day before pickup to avoid nosy scavengers) 

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