Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Montana’s Outdoor Hall of Fame

Montana’s rich outdoor legacy is no mistake. It’s the by-product of hard work, dedication and vision. Our territorial legislators knew that unregulated hunting and fishing were stripping our land. Our state legislators protected thousands of acres as Game Preserves long before the word Wilderness was ingrained in our psyche. Citizens led efforts to protect wildlife from slaughter, to protect our shared landscapes from unmitigated destruction and to ensure that every generation following had the same opportunity to hunt, fish and hike that our forefathers did.

On Saturday, December 6th at 6:00 PM in the Great Northern Hotel in Helena, a banquet will be held to induct the first class of inductees. You can find out more about the banquet here: http://montanatu.org/event/outdoor-hall-of-fame-banquet/

We owe the inaugural class of inductees a collective tip of our Stormy Kromers, a hearty handshake and a well deserved thanks (along with maybe a libation or two). Without folks like these, we would not have the world class hunting and fishing, or the access to those critters and public lands and waters, that we do today.

There's one person, however, who is not on this list and should be: Montana Outdoor Hall of Fame organizer and architect Jim Posewitz. Jim's dedication to Montana's wildlife, wild country and hunters and anglers is legendary in it's own right. We hope to see Jim's name in the Hall in upcoming classes. Well done, Mr. Posewitz!
Here’s the inaugural class:

Granville Stuart , 1834-1918
Granville Stuart came to Montana when it was still a territory in 1857 and noted the flourishing wildlife populations. Within a few years, the wildlife plummeted, and Stuart was instrumental in getting the hunting laws passed in the First Territorial Legislature.
Theodore Roosevelt 1858-1919
President Theodore Roosevelt set aside 230 million acres for conservation and created the national forest system. While Roosevelt did not spend a great deal of time in Montana, a bison hunt in 1883 among the slaughtered herds is often pointed to as a turning point in his life, leading to the conservation movement.
Charles M. Russell 1864-1926
Artist Charles M. Russell was famous for his western scenes that displayed and at times lamented the loss of wildness. “Civilization is nature’s worst enemy. All things vanish when she comes,” Russell said.
Lee Metcalf 1911-1978
Sen. Lee Metcalf, born in Stevensville, was a key figure in the creation and passage of the Wilderness Act of 1964, and his legacy includes sponsoring or writing the Clean Air Act of 1963, the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 1964, the Water Quality Act of 1965 and the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968.
Don Alrich 1912-1990
Born in Deer Lodge in 1912, Don Aldrich went on to lead the Western Montana Fish and Game Association and the Montana Wildlife Federation. He advocated for conservation from local to national levels, and had a hand in almost every wildlife, water, wilderness and mining issue from the 1950s until his death in 1990.
Bud Moore 1917-2010
Bud Moore changed the face of the U.S. Forest Service, advocating for wilderness and as a district ranger in Idaho, famously turning back a bulldozer that came to build a road through what would become the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness. He became the chief of fire management for the Forest Service’s northern region, shaping the philosophy from one of fire suppression to recognizing fire’s ecological role in nature.
Thurman Trosper 1918-2007
Ronan native Thurman Trosper played an important role as a wilderness and conservation advocate in the Forest Service, the Wilderness Society and within the Confederated Salish and Kootenai tribes. He became one of the first Native Americans to serve as a manager in the Forest Service but may be best known for his advocacy of the eventual Mission Mountain Wilderness on the Flathead Reservation.
Doris Milner 1920-2007
Doris Milner spent 40 years as an advocate for wilderness after moving to Hamilton in 1951. First inspired by the threat of a timber sale along the Selway River in the Magruder Corridor, she went on to join Idaho Sen. Frank Church and Montana Sen. Lee Metcalf in expanding the wilderness to include the corridor and designating the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.
Cecil Garland 1925-2014
Lincoln resident Cecil Garland worked for decades to see the 240,000-acre designation of the Scapegoat Wilderness. He pledged to protect the country he loved as one of the founders of the Lincoln Back Country Protective Association, which caused boycotts of his store in Lincoln. Despite pressure from the timber industry, Garland and others pushed as citizen advocates and saw the land protected in 1972.
Gerry Jennings 1940-
Gerry Jennings of Great Falls has been an active volunteer in the Montana Wilderness Association since the early 1990s. She has played a major role in shaping the present-day focus of wilderness advocacy in the state, serving in leadership positions for 12 years.
Ron Marcoux 1942-
Helena resident Ron Marcoux spent 22 years with Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, steering the fisheries division away from constant stocking of hatchery fish to developing wildly reproducing fisheries. He and others encountered plenty of resistance to the idea, but after proven successes, FWP adopted the policy statewide. Marcoux also spent a decade as associate director and deputy director with the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, developing its land acquisition, conservation easement and land donation programs.
Chris Marchion 1952-
Chris Marchion became an officer of the Anaconda Sportsmen Club in 1985, still serving as vice president today. With nearly three decades of conservation advocacy, he has worked on projects ranging from mining settlements on the Clark Fork River, formation of the Mount Haggin Game Range, the elimination of game farm hunting and drafting the Bighorn Sheep auction legislation, which has raised millions of dollars for bighorn conservation in the state.



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